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Textiles >> Enid Marx RDI (1902-1998)
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Enid Marx
Crown
TS.76.22.a
 
      
 
      
 
      
 

Educated at Roedean School, Brighton, Sussex, Enid Marx printed her first scarf while a schoolgirl. After training at the Central School of Art and Crafts (1921-2), where she studied drawing, pottery and printed textile design, she proceeded to the Royal College of Art to take wood-engraving and painting. On graduating in 1925 she worked for shortly over a year in Barron and Larcher's* textile-printing workshop. While learning the hand-blockprinters' and dyers' craft, she also designed her first pattern paper for the Curwen Press.

Enid Marx set up her first in a series of four workshops in Hampstead in 1926 and worked almost single-handedly until 1939, when she ceased blockprinting. For her blocks she used hardwoods or linoleum mounted on wood, and sometimes added metal pins to print as dots. She printed on cotton, linen, organdie and velveteen, using simple abstract or plant motifs.

As well as producing hand-blocked textiles, she carried out decorative designs, wallpapers, book jackets, illustrations and also received commissions for woven textile designs. Clients for the latter included the London Underground (1937) and the Utility Scheme (1944). She was elected to the faculty of Royal Designers for Industry (RDI) in 1944 and published English Popular Art (with Margaret Lambert) in 195?.

*Denotes included in the Crafts Study Centre Collection

 

 

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